Video presentation — fabric8 Camel microservices for Docker & Kubernetes

I gave a presentation at Riga Dev Day 2016 which was recorded and posted online on youtube today.

Title: fabric8 Camel microservices for Docker & Kubernetes

The slides for the talk is available on slideshare here.

The abstract of the talk is as follows:

The so-called experts are saying microservices and containers will change the way we build, maintain, operate, and integrate applications. This talk is intended for Java developers who wants to hear and see how you can develop Java microservices that runs in containers.

This talk uses Apache Camel as the Java library to build microservice architectured applications. At first we introduce you to Apache Camel and show how you can easily get started with Camel on your computer, and build a microservice application that runs on CDI and Spring-Boot.

The second part of this talk is about running Camel (or any Java project) on Docker and Kubernetes.

We start covering the basic concepts you as a Java developer must understand about Kubernetes. Then we show how to migrate Java projects to build as Docker images and deployable on Kubernetes, with help from fabric8 Maven tooling.

You will also hear about how to make your microservices scalable and distributed by leveraging the facilities that Kubernetes provides for truly distributed services with load balancing and location independence.

You will also see how to manage your container using the Kubernetes CLI and the fabric8 web console.

At the end we have a bit of fun with scaling up and down your Camel application to see how resilient the application is, when we kill containers.

This talk is a 50/50 mix between slides and demo.


Camel in Action 2 - One year later since we started

Its been a while since my last blog post or video.

I wanted to say some words about the progress of the work we do on the Camel in Action 2nd edition book.

I have noted in my calendar that I started writing the first words on Saturday March 7h 2015. Today one year later we are close to having 13 chapters done. Jonathan is finishing up the final touches on chapter 2. And yesterday I handed up my updates to the testing chapter to include a section covering Citrus Integration Testing with Camel.

All together on page counts, we have now surpassed the 1st edition which was 550 pages, and I estimate we are closing in on 600 pages. My last two chapters was rather long with about 70 pages each.

We are up for 2/3 round review where we will receive very valuable feedback from our readers. Thanks a lot. It really helps us steer the book in the right directions, and also help us focus on covering topics that are of the most interest.

There is still a many miles until we get to the finish line. But we are about to pass 66% and I am preparing for writing the chapter about microservices with Camel. I believe its a chapter that readers are looking forward to have in their hands.

Just a few words about writing a computer tech book. Its a lot of work besides the words on paper. At the same time we are building examples and providing source code for the book. And that do also take up a lot of time to do these code bits correct and of interest. We also spend time adding code comments and organizing the source code so you can browse the code on github, and quickly refer to where the code is being covered in detail in the book.

And you do this on a moving target. Apache Camel keeps marching on as usual, and we are very active working on the next release. At the same time Jonathan and I have to take notes about which of these changes/new features/etc are impacting the book. And then from time to time we have to circle back in past chapters and make updates accordingly.

So when you see that 10 out of 19 chapters are done in the Manning website. Then they are not done done. We are only done done when Manning tells us we are so, and that the book is heading into print. Well even so we are not done done, because after the book has been published, we keep updating the accompanying source code with future Camel releases. We have done that for 5 years since the 1st edition was published. Besides updates the source code we unfortunately may have mistakes slipping into the book, so with thanks from our readers, we have an errata to track those mistakes.

With the roads ahead of us I anticipate that Jonathan and I will have all the material ready in fall 2016, and the book enters type setting phase which is a process that Manning handles and that takes its time. That means the book will not be published in 2016, but in start of 2017.

Maybe at this time next year I can post a blog with the physical book in hand. That's gonna be a big big book. I estimate its going to be about 50% bigger than the 1st edition, so that is 800 pages.