2019-03-11

I am now a Java Champion

At the end of November last year I was officially welcomed as a new JavaChampion on twitter.



I was among 30 new champions in 2018 and I am very humble to be among all these great champions. As you most likely know my work with Java is heavily focused on the Apache Camel project, and its good to know that other influencers in the Java eco-system that are not invested in general Java, can be recognized for their hard work and be nominated as a champion.

You can find a list of the champions on the official list (updated yearly) and on github (updated frequently).

This weekend I received a welcome gift, which is the official JavaChampion t-shirt and jacket.






2019-02-22

Camel in Action / Apache Camel is not for everyone

Writing books is really hard, and you may think that when the book is finally published, you are all done. Well that is not the case for technical books, where our industry and the software stack the book covers is evolving.



For the Camel in Action books where we cover Apache Camel (no shit sherlock) is the same. We are from time to time, updating the source code examples to use newer version of Camel. This is curtesy to our readers so they have examples that runs on the latest Camel version at the time, and also used as a test-bed for the Apache Camel project, when we are testing/voting on new release candidates.

As an author you are also contacted from time to time by readers, whom have question to the book, its examples, and about Apache Camel in general. Thank you for the feedback and we love to get in touch with our readers, but sometimes we have to point people to use the general upstream community for the general Camel questions, when the subject is not specific about our book. And I would also like to thank the readers whom take the time to say thank you to us, that the book helped them get onboard Apache Camel, and other stories they can tell that made a difference.

We also get reports from the observable readers whom have found small mistakes in the book. We are very grateful for getting these to our attention so we can update the errata.

Then finally we have people doing book reviews (awesome, thank you for doing this, we appreciate all honest reviews). Most often we get positive feedback, and that the book has a lot to offer the readers. However we occasionally get the reviews from readers whom very likely have the book for the wrong reason.

For our second edition, we have two such examples from Amazon US and Germany. I have to the best of my ability responded to those reviews, with our point of view, and trying to explain/address their critique. All we want is for potential new readers to have the fact at their hands, and can make a better decision whether to purchase the book or not.

And I want to end this blog with me officially saying

Apache Camel is not for everyone

( but its still the most used open source integration framework in the universe )


Amazon.com review - Not very useful




Amazon.de review - Nahezu nutzlos..



2019-01-25

Webinar - Develop Cloud Native Microservices using Apache Camel

On next thursday 31st January 2019 I am presenting a live webinar about developing cloud native microservices with Apache Camel.


The session is scheduled for a full hour including QA. The talk with be a mix of slides and live demos. It will be my first talk with revealing details about Apache Camel 3 and a peak and demo of Camel K (next-gen serverless Camel on Kubernetes).

The abstract of the talk is as follows

Apache Camel has fundamentally changed the way enterprise Java developers think about system-to-system integration by making enterprise integration patterns (EIP) a simple declaration in a lightweight application—wrapped and delivered as a single JAR.

In this webinar, we’ll show you how to bring EIP best practices to containers running on top of Kubernetes and deployed as Spring Boot microservices, which are both cloud-native and cloud-portable.

We'll discuss:

  • How building and designing cloud-native microservices impacts the way we develop.
  • How to build distributed and fault-tolerant microservices.
  • The upcoming Camel 3.0 release, which includes serverless capabilities via Camel K.

Registration

The webinar is scheduled on thursday 31st of January at 11am ET (5pm CET) and is of course free to attend. All you need to do is to register at the provided link.


More webinars

We have talked about continuing the webinar with a series of Camel and agile integration talks. So if you are interested to hear more webinars and have requests for topics to be covered then we are open for feedback.

2019-01-11

Apache Camel explained to Luke Skywalker

A long time ago in a galaxy far,
far away ...
there was a a young boy,
whom went to
... 



What a story. So Mark Hamill is addressed as Mr Camel. What an honour to have him in our Camel family and to be known as the first Mr Camel. The 2nd Mr Camel is our spirit animal for the Apache Camel project.



Okay back to Luke Skywalker, so his tweet lead to people talking about Camel's and I was then brought into the conversation whether Mark's audition story was my inspiration for Apache Camel, which again lead to Mark Hamill (Luke Skywalker) asking what Apache Camel is:



I must say I have never seen the day, where Luke Skywalker would ask me what Apache Camel is 😃 - I am a great fan of Star Wars and yes I am so old that I favour the first 3 classic movies.


Explaining what Apache Camel is to Luke Skywalker

At first though you may think that Apache Camel is a new model of the 4-legged walker with or without humps 🙃 ... but it is NOT



Instead let us ask the most wise man in the universe, Yoda, for the answer:

"Software that enables you to do integrations between other softwares, it is." - Yoda


And in my humble words ...

"What the force telekinesis does for universal Jedi connection ... the Apache Camel does for universal computer integration .... mindblow powers they are" - DavsClaus

And here is another great explanation from Matthew what Apache Camel is:



Has Luke Skywalker used Apache Camel?

Yes Mark you would unknowingly have used Apache Camel. Here is why. 

Apache Camel is a software project that has been around for over a decade. And its a very succesfull project and are thus widespread in use across all industries, enterprises, government institutions, and used in all parts of our planet.

In the US, for example, the FAA uses Camel in their services for air-traffic control. So anyone whom has been traveling by plane in the US airspace (covers 15% of the planet) would have used Camel.

Camel is also ubiquitous used among banking and finance enterprises, so any US citizen whom has done bank transfers, credit card transactions etc would at one point have the banking systems exchange data via software with Camel included.

If you are a Netflix subscriber then their payment system is using Camel as well. If you have a parcel delivery by brown-trucks (UPS) then Camel is helping with the track and trace.


Epilogue

Thank you Mark Hamill for asking me what Apache Camel is. I have been working on Apache Camel for more than 10 years and I still not able to explain it to the common man in a few words. Even trying to explain it to my peers in the IT industry is failing, evident by my last book is a staggering 900 page monster 🙃


May the force be with you

2019-01-03

Apache Camel 2018 Numbers

Its been 2 years since I last did a blog post about the Camel numbers.


Just to do a quick post on some of the numbers for the Apache Camel project in year 2018.

Number of releases in 2018: 12
Number of posts on Camel user forum in 2018: 1266
Number of gitter chat users at end of 2018: 428
Number of commits in 2018: 3600 (git shortlog -ns --since 2018-01-01 --until 2019-01-01 | cut -c1-7 | awk '{ SUM += $1} END { print SUM }')

Total number of JIRA tickets created at end of 2018: 13033
Number of JIRA tickets created in 2018: 924
Number of JIRA tickets resolved in 2018: 766

Stackoverflow number of questions at end of 2018: 8375
Stackoverflow number of watchers at end of 2018: 1.8k

Number of stars on github at end of 2018: 2303
Total number of commits at end of 2018: 34431
Total number of contributors on github at end of 2018: 447
Number of closed pull requests at end of 2018: 2674
Number of closed pull requests in 2018: 280 (is:pr is:closed merged:>=2018-01-01)
Number of committers doing commits in 2018: 184 (git shortlog --since 2018-01-01 --until 2019-01-01 -ns | wc -l).

The Apache Software Foundation recently posted a summary of the most active projects in 2018 and Apache Camel was ranked 4th by commits.

You can find more statistics for example at GitHub and OpenHub.

Happy New Year and 2019 is going to be a special year for Apache Camel, with Camel 3 in the works.